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Canadian ETF flows were solid in November, with domestic and U.S. equity funds leading the pack, says the latest ETF report from National Bank’s Daniel Straus, Ling Zhang and Tiffany Zhang.

Canadian ETFs had inflows of $1.6 billion in November, or nearly 2% of starting assets, it says, noting that “preferred equity ETFs are still seeing inflows, as investors do potential tax loss harvesting trades.”

In the U.S., November marked another month of strong inflows, says an accompanying National Bank ETF report. The report says funds that tap into U.S. large-caps and developed, international markets attracted the most assets. Meanwhile, “Fixed Income saw rotations out of U.S. government and high yield, into investment-grade [corporates].”

Looking at specific sectors in the U.S., tech and financial attracted flows while the utilities, staples, and healthcare sectors saw outflows.

Also read:

Active ETFs gaining momentum

Will new ETF rules let MFDA advisors compete with IIROC reps?

IIROC proposal changes game for advisors

Despite global uncertainty, ETFs gather steam

Originally published on Advisor.ca
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VSIVA

Investors prefer EFT than mutual funds due to the greedy mutual funds advisors who create a bad name to the industry. These bad apples must be removed from the industry to put an end to unethical, immoral, greedy business practices instead of research and recommend superior products to clients; 10% free switches are a mess to clients with several transaction confirmations to reconcile that confuse the clients, DSC TO DSC to generate additional commission, Free and matured units are moved to a new DSC schedule to generate commission including to Seg funds, clients incur unreasonable DSC charges (RESP and RRIF payments too) due to failure in DSC suitability by the advisors and lack of dealer policies to prevent unreasonable charges to clients, put an end to wrongdoing, or compensate the poor clients.

Wednesday, January 6 @ 6:42 pm //////

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