In line with its pricing changes implemented at earlier this year, Franklin Templeton Investments Corp. has introduced Series M. It offers Canadian investors a new option for high net worth pricing in a fee-based model. This new fee-for-service series offers preferred pricing for a selection of mutual funds across a range of asset classes.

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“We are very excited to launch Series M for Canadian investors, as many are increasingly opting to transition to a fee-based relationship with their advisor,” says Philip Bensen, head of National Sales – Canada for Franklin Templeton Investments. “Series M offers further fee reductions relative to our existing fee-for-service Series F.”

At a minimum investment threshold of $100,000 based on total household assets, Series M gives advisors and their clients a way to build portfolios from 13 investment options, covering a variety of asset classes.

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The following funds are available in Series M:

Fund name Management

Fee

Fixed Rate

Administration

Fee

FIXED INCOME
Franklin Bissett Corporate Bond Fund 0.45% 0.15%
Templeton Global Bond Fund 0.65% 0.22%
BALANCED
Franklin Quotential Diversified Income Corporate Class Portfolio 0.63% 0.17%
Franklin Quotential Balanced Growth Corporate Class Portfolio 0.65% 0.24%
Franklin Bissett Canadian Balanced Corporate Class 0.60% 0.19%
Franklin Bissett Dividend Income Corporate Class 0.70% 0.16%
Templeton Global Balanced Fund 0.65% 0.23%
EQUITY
Franklin Bissett Canadian Equity Corporate Class 0.65% 0.23%
Franklin Bissett Canadian High Dividend Corporate Class 0.75% 0.25%
Franklin U.S. Rising Dividends Corporate Class 0.65% 0.28%
Franklin Global Small-Mid Cap Fund 0.75% 0.30%
Templeton Growth Corporate Class 0.60% 0.35%
Franklin Mutual Global Discovery Corporate Class 0.75% 0.33%

The Series M fund line-up includes the newly launched Franklin Global Small-Mid Cap Fund, which seeks to capitalize on theaverage capital gain potential of small- and mid-cap global companies in developed countries around the world.

Originally published on Advisor.ca

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