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Do you suspect someone at work is trying to sink your career? You’re not alone.

A survey from The Creative Group finds 31% of advertising and marketing executives said a colleague has tried to make them look bad on the job.

But it seems fewer professionals are engaging in this type of ill behaviour: This figure is down from 50% in a similar study conducted in 2008.

When executives were asked how best to deal with a sabotaging co-worker, 41% said to confront the person directly; 70% of respondents felt the same way in 2008.

Another 40% of executives believe notifying the individual’s manager or human resources is the ideal solution, up from 10% seven years ago.

“A little workplace competition can be healthy and motivating, but if a colleague crosses the line to get an edge over fellow coworkers, it can make for a stressful environment,” says Deborah Bottineau, senior regional manager of The Creative Group. “The ability to adapt your style to a variety of personalities, and find a balance between being competitive and professional, is vital to maintaining productive work relationships and ensuring long-term career success, especially in more collaborative positions.”

Originally published on Advisor.ca

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